Letter Quest: Grimm’s Journey now out on Android!

Letter Quest: Grimm’s Journey is now available on Google Play! Our official release date is Feb. 5, 2014 but since the Android build was ready to go, we thought we’d get a little head start on that version! We’ve already had lots of positive feedback about the Android version, and everyone seems to be enjoying it. This makes us super-happy! So give the game a try, see what you think! Feel free to leave us a comment or a review if you get a chance, we’d love to hear your feedback....

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Let’s Play Permission

Recently I came across this awesome list of companies that allow anyone to make Let’s Play videos, monetize those videos, etc. As a company we wholeheartedly support this idea! So here it is (fairly officially) stated: feel free to record, monetize, and do whatever you like with footage of any of our games, both current and future titles. We’d love it if people shared footage of any/all of our games! For those that are curious, here’s some links about this issue and the troubles it has caused for Let’s Players, as well as some general info on the monetization of youtube videos: http://wiiudaily.com/2013/05/nintendo-lets-play-controversy/ http://www.technobuffalo.com/2013/12/18/publishers-likely-not-reporting-youtube-lets-play-creators/ http://www.gamasutra.com/blogs/MonaIbrahim/20131212/206912/Deconstructing_Lets_Play_Copyright_and_the_YouTube_Content_ID_Claim_System_A_Legal_Perspective.php http://www.incgamers.com/2013/12/youtube-chaos-lets-play-channels-copyright-claims-flood...

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Letter Quest Released!

Letter Quest: Grimm’s Journey is now out for iOS and Android. If you have a moment please consider voting for Letter Quest on Steam Greenlight: Get Letter Quest...

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“Proper” Android Support

Letter Quest: Grimm’s Journey was just approved by Apple earlier today! Very exciting as it’s our first game. Since submitting to Apple five days ago, I’ve been focusing on getting an Android version working. Overall it’s been pretty straight-forward, although I’m not sure that my approach is the “correct” one (if there is such a thing!). I’ve seen plenty of people talking about dpi, if the device is a tablet or phone, different resolutions, etc. Seeing as our game has quite a lot of art that doesn’t resize very well (we do use 3 and 9slices extensively, but that’s only for component backgrounds, buttons, etc. – doesn’t help with icons, etc.), I ended up going with my own approach. My solution is actually pretty simple. I now have 1x, 1.5x, 2x, 3x, and 4x assets for Android. That might seem crazy, but here’s my reasoning: there are so many odd resolutions that are somewhere between what you would use for 1x or 2x assets, for example 800×480 – the 1x assets are way too small, and the 2x assets are way too big. I tried doing some zooming in/out and scaling up/down of the stage, but it always ended up looking pretty terrible. So now I just check the lower of the two resolution values (from the width and height), and use that to decide on which set of assets I use. Surprisingly, this works out for every resolution I’ve tried! I had to do a bit of custom positioning for a few components in the game, such as the battle buttons and the tileboard, but overall everything just worked. Sure, I now have 5 separate copies of all game artwork, but that’s actually less horrible than you might think – all of the 4x images together only total about 9 MB, so in total for all 5 sets of images it’s sitting around 28 MB, and that’s before any kind of optimizing (PNG crushing, etc.). I can live with that! Here’s a screen shot from a battle at six different resolutions, simulating six very different Android devices, just to show how it ended up looking: 1024×600 (we use 1023×600 in-game) Galaxy S @ 800×480 Galaxy S3 @ 1280×720 Nexus 5 @ 1920×1080 Nexus 7 @ 1200×800 Nexus 7 @...

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Source Code Visualization With Wordle

I recently heard about Wordle which is a website that will create word clouds from text that you provide. I figured it might be fun to run that against the full source code for Letter Quest. Letter Quest is currently 45,482 lines of code, 37,329 if you ignore comments and whitespace lines. There really isn’t too much to learn from this image, but it is neat to see the game’s source represented this way. Although you can see from the image that I’ve still got quite a few “TODO”s left, mostly optimization items at this point. Also, “public” is used a whole lot, and that is because ActionScript is still pretty slow at making function calls, so I use public vars in a lot of places instead of getters and...

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